May 11, 2013

Video of the new Verbos 247v sequential voltage source

video

Here's a quick video of my 247v module in my Buchla 200 cabinet. It shows some of the sequencing features. The 247v is connected to a 259, 281 and 292. The 281 is in sustained mode to get the benefits of the variable pulse length on the 247v. To start, I run it from it's internal clock and switch around the stages' on-off-slide switches. Then, I run it from an external pulse from the 281. This shows how the TIME MULT control acts like a pulse length/slide length control. I then show some tricks with patching stages into the strobe input and send in voltage to the analog input from an off stage 254 to select which stages are playing. There are loads more features, using the yellow inputs to make envelopes and stuff. I hope this starts to show it off...

April 17, 2013

The 247v Sequential Voltage Source


I have been working on a new Sequential Voltage Source. It is only a single module space and packs a big punch. It does most of the things a MARF or ARF does, but without any menus. It can act as an 8 stage sequencer with two rows, voltage control of the clock/slide rate, switchable slides/pulses, pulse outs on each channel and the ability to loop from any stage to any stage.  It can act as a multi-stage envelope, up to all 8 stages with any stage as a sustain stage or any stage pausing unless a key is held. It can act as ADSR, AHDSR, HADSR, AD, AR, AHD, LFO saw, pulse, square, triangle, something more complex, LFO that only runs when a key is held, LFO that only runs when a key is lifted.

I wanted a small sequencer with every function on the panel. I wanted to do TB-303/MC-202 type sequences with slides selectable per stage, where the pulse output holds the whole stage on a slide stage but only pulses 25% of the stepped stages. I desperately scrambled to complete two for my performance during the NAMM show. I made panels from PCBs because they take less time to manufacture. I only got one finished and then it didn't work when I got there! Anyway, it's working now. It's pretty fun.

misc. banks on the 263v



The 263v has been a lot of fun. When I programmed the scales, I had a bunch of left over memory spaces. I filled those spaces with random voltage sequences that are similar to the ones in the middle sections of the 266. Of course they are addressed by control voltage instead of pulses, so they have different uses. I threw in a set of 16 smooth random patterns. If you send in an LFO, you get back something like the fluctuating randoms in a 266, well not "random" but fluctuating. Finally, I through in some pulse sequences and some melodic sequences. Using the random sequences and the melodic sequences is a bit like dropping a sample loop into music (you have to trim the start time and length using a voltage processor).  I hope that these functions add something useful to the toolkit.

BTW. I also got it to track 2 volts/octave for the old Buchla guys who need that.